Don’t become a professional photographer!

There is an old saying that something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it. Sadly, in the age of digital photography that means nobody is willing to pay what you think it’s worth. Rarely now will they even pay you what it cost you to take the photo.

Let me give you an example:

I have some images from a recent trip on Shutterstock. They have sold quite well so far and I have amassed the grand sum of $2.25 for them. Yes, you read that correctly, I have sold my images and received $2.25. Now, how much of a loss am I at here? Well, petrol is the equivalent of $6.67 a gallon for starters.

Let’s say the trip consisted of 300miles at 54mpg (the average I get from my VW Polo), then I used 5.56 gallons at a total cost of $37.08. Without accommodation, food, or any other expenses (camera costs, insurance, or my time of course) then I am already facing the prospect of at least another 16months of consistent sales to break even on fuel alone.

Shutterstock, and they are just one drop in the competing ocean, pay just $0.25 per image sale on subscribers downloads until you get reasonably well known.

For many people this is a non-starter: Sure, over the years you might see a return on your money, and if you have several thousand images on several sites you might see a profit, in time. But, what you live off in the meantime and how you fund trips and creating new images is another matter.

What about selling your images as fine art prints? Well, you have the initial outlay of the print, framing, and then finding someone to sell it for you in a shop or gallery. You then you have to hope it sells and you get your money back plus a little profit, and after you’ve paid the commission to the gallery. You also need somewhere as storage to put them, between displays, if they don’t all sell. Which they won’t.

For many people this is a non-starter: Again there is the investment need, you have to spend to accumulate is the old saying, but where do you accumulate in order to spend?

So, what can you do to sell your images or make money from your photography in the 21th Century when everyone has a camera? I honestly don’t have the answer, but I do know that the number of people making a sustainable living is ever decreasing. Look in any magazine and you will see the same faces, and very frequently the same rehashed articles – if you want an example take a look at the excellent photos from Fukushima.

This is now the third magazine I’ve seen them in. They’re good, but I am not buying yet another magazine with them in so I missed buying this edition. You can’t blame the photographer for spreading them thinly to get a return on their investment, and you can’t blame an editor for wanting to use good images.

Getting in with magazines requires you to be able to write now as well as take excellent photographs, with the odd exception of art or photography magazines which will take your images only. But even then, often now you get a ‘gift’ instead of money – a camera rucksack for publishing your portfolio anyone? Not me, got one, and I can’t bank another rucksack. I could sell it on eBay I suppose but that won’t bring me a return anything like what it costs me to get those images.

What about getting your work noticed in the first place? Exposure, that fateful word…the one that to 99% of outlets means they ain’t going to pay you a dime. Have you tried to get a plumber to work for ‘exposure’? Have you tried to buy your lunch with ‘exposure’? Art industries are the only industries where ‘we’ (and not me actually) accept exposure as an excuse or licence for not paying a fair price, or even any price.

What does that say about how we value our own work? Aren’t we making a rod for our own backs? If I, we, are going to accept $0.25 an image what are we telling people we are worth? If some of us are happy to see our name in lights (or rather print) and have a swanky new camera bag in return for our hard won images what are we saying about the value we place on our images and our industry?

But, and here is the but, what choices do we have? The answer is very little because if we don’t then we don’t get a look in anymore. Unless you are already well known and established then I fear that the days of the full time photographer are sadly numbered, and even the most well known and respected professionals are diversifying and now make as much money (if not more) from teaching other photographers, either one-to-one or on group workshops and holidays as they do from selling the actual images they shoot. The best of the best – National Geographic – has shed staff and freelancers since the buy out by the horrible Murdoch lead group. Most newspapers now buy in images from freelancers and don’t employ their own photographers anymore.

We are bombarded with visual content, and for every images you have to pay for your can find a dozen that are almost as good for free, or for very little. Photography is now becoming a race to the bottom, and an industry that many dream of entering either as students or dream of turning hobbies into their living. Want my advice? Don’t do it.

There was an interview on my local news station the other day with a retired press photographer and he was asked what advice he would give budding photojournalists today. He said; ‘buy a guitar, there’s not money in photography anymore’.

Is there a future for photographers? I guess we wait and see. We continue to try to elevate our work to the highest standard, we continue to push new markets and new directions, we try to get our work noticed by those who still value the craft and the art of photography and we do so with thousands snapping at our heels who are happy with $0.25 an image or working for ‘exposure’ that they hope will lead to bigger things but usually just leads you to more payment free job opportunities or being passed over for the next hopeful.

It’s a cruel world.

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Adobe Photoshop goes to the Cloud, and a storm is brewing

Adobe has recently issued new updates for subscribers to its Lightroom and Photoshop products. We now have Lightroom Classic; which is an update to the traditional program for those of us working and storying images offline, plus Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC: Creative Cloud programs which now operate from the Cloud.

Whilst I get this move they have completely failed to take into consideration the global audience which does not have reliable and quick access to the internet. They have also failed completely to understand the issues of large image files, which is kind of weird for a company who have made their millions from tens of thousands of photographers and designers. It is also ignoring the market demands and technology advances that are currently bringing out cameras with larger and larger file sizes. We have just seen the new Sony and the Nikon D850 – both producing mega sized files.

As well as having your monthly subscription to use the applications, already something that had many photographers up in arms (whilst allowing those of us will more limited cashflow the advantage of PAYG), now, if we go the cloud route, we will have to hire our Cloud space. This may not sound too bad, unless your image archive runs into the tens of thousands, and you have an internet connection that is slow.

In practical terms for me, as a landscape photographer who travels regularly to remote locations where I am very lucky even to have a non-G phone signal at best, it is completely unworkable. I cannot guarantee that I will have any internet access at all from any location I am working in, and in fact I can more often guarantee the exact opposite – you won’t be able to get hold of me at all!

Without wifi, without a mobile signal, one of the pleasures of the wilds of Scotland or any other country with any wilderness is that we are cut off away from these modern (in)conveniences. It is often one of the reasons that many of us enjoy our profession as difficult as it can make the ‘business’ element of what we do.

I can only talk about the difficulty that this places on those of us in parts of Scotland – an affluent first world nation, but those difficulties are limited just to us of course. How will this work for correspondents in remoter locations and those areas of the world that frequently go without electricity let alone phone lines, mobile signals, and wifi. Wifi is not ubiquitous, not even in the USA where Adobe calls home.

At the moment we still have the non-cloud version, but by separating this out it becomes fairly obvious that we will either be charged differently (and probably more expensively) or at some point in the future our service will no longer be supported. Adobe assures us, at least for the foreseeable future, that we will get served but what is a foreseeable future? I can’t tell you exactly what I am going to be doing next week, so realistically can, or will, they?

My currently subscription takes me to the 15th December 2017. At this point I expect them to push me, from a purely cost based incentive point of view, to move to the cloud. However, for me, working often without the internet, it isn’t a feasible option. Do I renew my subscription and hope they keep Classic going and updated or perhaps it is time to find another solution.

As someone who has worked with Photoshop since it started, in 1998 (yes, I am that old) I am very sorry to leave. I do not really want to have to learn a whole new program and say goodbye to what is 30 years of experience and the ability to process my images without ever using the help menu. I don’t actually do a lot of work with my images, and in fact, I rarely work outside of Lightroom now. But, I do shoot Raw for a good reason, and I do process my Raw files, like everyone does. I also actually like Lightroom’s indexing and keywording, and the ability to find things and conduct a search. If you have an extensive archive this is very important. I will miss it if I have to go, but I have always titled my folders so that I can find things without this and I reckon that I am going to pretty glad that I did. It will be slower and more troublesome, but I will have to manage. We did before, and will after in PPS (post-Photoshop) time.

Personally, the move away from Adobe has to be viewed as pretty inevitable. Cost has played a huge factor over the years, and to me the subscription was actually a benefit because it spread that cost, but I know that many photographers have boycotted and moved away from Adobe because of this. I know a good few who are already using some very old stand alone versions and then using other software, such as their camera manufacturers free programs to do an initial convert to their Raw files, but this adds to the workflow in a way I don’t, personally, want.

So, what now? Well, I am experimenting with Affinity. I have had this program on my iPad Pro for a couple of months, and find it pretty good. I only use it away from home and for processing files so that in the off moments I have a suitable signal I can update my online media. Such is the way of modern marketing, if it ain’t fresh it ain’t getting looked at, but, I can process without the wifi or mobile signal, so although I am using it for the web I am not using the Cloud.  The Cloud is not an option for me.

And I haven’t even gone into the security issues of having my images stored singularly and remotely!

Time to experiment with Affinity for the desktop – I have a month to make my decision…

Why is Social Media so rude?

Today I posted a little non-offensive comment on Twitter that I thought huge files from the D850 or new Sony A7iii (or whatever it’s called) were unnecessary for the vast majority of applications. Nice, but unnecessary. You would have thought that I had called someone Hitler’s mother!

The vitriol on most social media platforms is quite astounding. Have we, as a society, really got so rude and full of hatred to our fellow humans that we can display this tendency over something so trivial? It would appear so.

A few days ago I mentioned, again on Twitter on my non-photographic feed, that a survey that was conducted into the reasons for voting for Brexit, and that this included a response that some more mature voters (mainly those who remembered WWII) didn’t like the EU because they felt that Germany has too much power. It wasn’t a statement I made, it was a fact from a survey of voters and I made that clear. The abuse, often retweeted, was actually scary.

You would have thought that I was suddenly an advocate of Brexit, in the eyes of some, but equally I was abused by Brexiteers who looked on it another way and thought I was an ‘idiot loser remainer’. I was attacked by both camps, and people were retweeting abusive or at least rude replies to me with enthusiasm.

For the record, I am against Brexit, but I do feel that we need to examine ALL the reasons why people chose to vote the way they did – not just the ones that suit us, or the ones that agree with us and our individual belief or vote.

In order to understand when something has gone in a largely unexpected direction, it is useful to consider the reasons for that, and all of them. The UK has very large social problems and pretending that the problems don’t exist does not make them go away.

I tried to clarify this position, without siding with either side. Just pointing out I was the messenger not the message, and that we need to look at everyones reasons and opinions. We all need to understand how each other feels, it is essential for communication and moving forward.

More abuse followed. I was called a racist, a coward, labelled as ignorant, and several things I shall not type were thrown at me. I even had personal messages from both camps which were far from polite. I was even offered a plane ticket to leave and go back where I came from, which is hard, when I am where I came from…

It appears now that anyone and everyone is fair game. The most innocent comment can get you a heap of abuse. To prove this point I commented on another feed of mine that; ‘I, personally, don’t much like cheese. Nothing wrong with it, I just don’t like the taste’. It wasn’t a reply to anything, just a single little comment on my own timeline.

How offensive can my personal food preference be? You’d be amazed…

‘Well, that’s because you have absolutely no taste and are ignorant of the finer qualities of decent food’

 

‘F*** off. Your obviously uneducated trash. What the f***s wrong with cheese?’
(Original spellings which questions who exactly is uneducated here…)

 

‘Well, you’ve never had a decent cheese then’

These were just three.

I have never liked cheese. I don’t like bananas either. I look silly in the colour yellow because of the tone of my skin. But I don’t mind if other people eat bananas or cheese, or like yellow. Some people look great in yellow, I look ill.

We are all different. I am quite sure that if you sit and talk to people around you right now you will find that some people like the same foods as you and some people don’t. But really, ‘F*** off’ and ‘uneducated trash’. Just because I don’t happen to like the taste of cheese?

The assumption that suddenly, if exposed to a ‘decent cheese’ I am going to change a 47 year history of not liking the taste of something?

I actually deleted the tweets and deactivated my Twitter account.

I have also removed Facebook and Twitter from my mobile devices. I have to deliberately go to my desktop and login now and it’s something that I am only intending on doing because a modern business is expected to have social media presence. If I didn’t have a business to run then I would delete every single account!

I wonder about a society where it is ok to abuse people you don’t know and will, probably, never meet because they made one little post about nothing of importance that you personally don’t feel the same way about.

People commit suicide because of abuse on social media. This is a fact, and a sad comment on the comments of our “society”. Are we even a society anymore when we cannot abide someone having a different opinion to us, especially about something trivial as what they may or may not have for dinner?

Right now, we are in the middle of numerous scandals about the abuse of women in various professions. Something which, to be frank, has gone on in every walk for life for as long as I can remember. That doesn’t make it right, but it has taken a damned long time for anyone to even talk about doing something about it. It has taken a damned long time to be unacceptable.

Too damned long, and to be honest, I don’t really think it will change unless we all want it too.

How long will it take before it become unacceptable to abuse someone online for making a comment about not liking cheese?

 Update: Following on from writing this piece I have decided that I am no longer going to engage in certain social media. This isn’t because of comments made directly to me, but simply by watching the comments and counter comments on some of the Facebook groups pages to which I am a member. I have more followers on Instagram and on my websites than I do on Facebook and Twitter anyway. The fact that Donal Trump runs his presidency from Twitter is enough of an indictment on that platform! LOL.

I still think it is a very sad reflection of our society now that people find it so acceptable to insult and argue with others over such tiny individual choices. Very soon we will also be expected to wear a uniform and not question anyone else’s opinions. That will be a very sad development for countries which have brought us some of the greatest thinkers and writers of all time.

 

Why I abandoned mirrorless cameras and returned to a Nikon DSLR

I really wanted to move to mirrorless cameras. I was keen to explore a lighter, smaller, more compact and cartable photographic experience. But, I needed to retain the same quality, or improve on what I had. It didn’t quite work out as well as I had hoped and so I’m now back with Nikon, well over a grand down in the pocket for the experience, and a whole lot wiser.

What I am going to say will be controversial to some readers, and that’s ok. Please remember that it is my very personal experience that I am relating, and not a statement of fact condemning any manufacture, cameras, or whatever. Please don’t see it as an invite to send me nasty messages or comments. They might even get published so you will only embarrass yourself. Oh, and all the images are Copyright of me so keep your mitts off.

For me, it started with Fujifilm – the X-Pro 1 came out with two free lenses, the 18mm (not really wide enough), and the 27mm (hmmm, ok as a standard). I loved it, and I took some great photos. But I wanted convenience of a zoom, because I spend a lot of time in wet conditions and I have a tendency to drop things…

I also wanted consistent f2.8.

I had a little trouble holding the very flat body when I was used to a more hand friendly shaped grip. My back and shoulders loved the experience and the photos were top quality, but I would have liked a wider wide angle and I would have liked better focussing, oh and longer battery life. And a zoom with f2.8…

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A zoom, any zoom, didn’t feel good on the rangefinder body, at least to me. It made the whole camera holding experience even worse. The X-Pro series is designed for fast primes, it is what they really excel at. But, I am not a street photographer, I’m usually found in fields, up to my arse in mud, frequently in the rain; I live in Scotland. The X-Pro 1, I don’t think, is weather sealed. I didn’t tempt it.

The lens range simply wasn’t there for me, not at that time. I do object to being forced to buy lenses just from Fujifilm. Ok, I have had Nikon bodies with Nikon lenses, but I have also really enjoyed some Tokina lenses and one (and only one) Sigma lens before.

So, anyway, it went away and was replaced by a Nikon D7100, which was all I could afford at the time. But I hadn’t quite got away from really wanting something smaller and lighter, especially at the end of 15mile hike. So that went away to be replaced by the Fujifilm XT-1, which was so much better suited to the zooms than the rangefinder bodies. I still struggled to find a zoom that met my needs, until in the end I got the 16-55mm/f2.8. It is an amazing lens, except that it is actually about the same weight and size as many DSLR lenses, which makes it very front heavy and somewhat unbalanced on the XT-1. I bought a grip, it was better, but now my camera weighed what a DSLR did and took up more space in my bag than my Nikon D7100 did!

It felt like it always wanted to fall forward, even on a tripod, and I had to really make sure it was secure. The lens weighed more than the body and it was huge by comparison. I wasn’t saving much weight, it was awkward to hold, but the results were great and I persevered. I love Fujifilm’s film simulations, nobody does it better, but…

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Ardvreck Castle. XT-1, XF 16-55mm f2.8 R LM WR
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Quirang, Isle of Skye. XT-2, XF 16-55mm f2.8 R LM WR

Then the Fujifilm XT-2 came out, and it offered (allegedly) a number of improvements over the XT-1. These, to me, included a flip out screen that went in two directions so you can use it in portrait as well as in landscape, and a jog-stick thing for moving the focus point. Believe me, it was a bit of a pain moving it on the XT-1. Unbeknown to me, my (bought used) XT-1 developed a row of dead pixels, and so I was delighted to part with whilst still under its used warranty (by three days, phew) and so I got a decent deal. It wasn’t very old, and it hadn’t take that many shots so this worried me, and it sat like the elephant in the room over my decision to stay with Fujifilm. I have used Nikon camera’s for years and never experience a dead pixel issue. Jammed shutters on Canon cameras have blighted all three I have owned but never had an issue with Nikon…(and hopefully that hasn’t just tempted fate).

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Fairy Pools, Isle of Skye. XT-2, XF 16-55mm f2.8 R LM WR

I got my XT-2 brand new. It was like “hens teeth” to get one new, and it would be months or even years before any appeared on the used market. I was concerned by the amount of money I had now invested, and that dead pixel issue reared its head again when I found the XT-2 came with an option for pixel re-mapping in the menu. I wonder why they put that in….? Perhaps there had been complaints.

(Incidentally the OM PEN-F has that option too)

Anyway, more great pictures followed. Although to me, they weren’t actually as great as the ones from the XT-1. The new camera gave me 24MP but to me, there was something I can’t define that was missing from these images that is there with the lower 16MP images from the XT-1. Maybe it’s colour, dynamic range, I don’t know. Sometimes you just find something you like in a camera and moan when they change it. I had the same thing with the D200, the last of the CCD sensors. I still to this day like the look of a D200 image over a D700 image, and I shot both at the same time.

But back to my story – I now wanted more lenses, and the ones I wanted were all large, heavy, and to be frank they are darned expensive. You still have to stick with Fujifilm or go fully manual with a very excellent Samyang. The other odd thing that kept striking me when I picked it up and used the dials was that the XT-2 didn’t seem quite as well made as the XT-1 and I had concerns bit were going to drop off it. They didn’t but I was worried…

I know there are reports online of dials breaking so maybe my concern wasn’t totally unfounded. I didn’t see these until after I’d parted company with it, so they didn’t influence my decision.

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XT-2, with XF 16-55mm f2.8 R LM WR

If I had the money, and the desire, to go out an buy a mirrorless camera today then I think I would choose the XT-1 over the XT-2. It really does feel better and I actually preferred the results.

I personally think that 16MP is the peak of perfection for a 1.5x crop sensor and that 24MP pushes it too far. But that is me, and every time I post a negative comment or review I get hate mail, but there you go. That’s the internet for you!

To me, with the big lens and with or without a grip, it still felt unbalanced,. You put a heavy, big, lump of fast glass at the front of a body which ways less and has a small hand grip then it is going to.

I really began questioning my missing of the DSLR lens to body balance. I certainly wasn’t saving that much in weight, or size.

To be honest, I have never thought that size is much of an issue. It is more to do with the weight of what you are carrying that determines how pleasant that 10mile hike is going to be. My camera bag remains the same and so I just move padding around to accommodate the size of the items within. I think there is where actually mirrorless manufacturers are going wrong. Having a decent size gives you a secure and comfortable grip in use, and this doesn’t change because hands are, basically, still hands. It isn’t space that’s an issue for me, it is weight.

Also, I am used to carrying my DSLR one handed, it’s just the way that I work. My Fuji’s both really required me to get neck straps because they weren’t comfortable in the hand for very long, and I have real neck issues. My neck issues were one of the reasons I wanted to lighten the load, so I definitely didn’t want my camera back around there again. Without having something to tuck your fingers around it isn’t comfy to single hand hold and wander about with. So it the camera goes around your neck, or in your bag. If it’s in your bag you take less pictures.

I figured that if I was going to go light, then I wanted to be balanced and really light. I wasn’t convinced by the argument that a bigger sensor is better, I think it’s down to the number of pixel balanced with the size of the sensor. A bigger sensor can take more pixels of the same size as a small sensor, if that makes sense. I think, from my personal experience that there is a optimum point. With a compact it’s 10MP, with a 4/3rd it’s probably around 12MP, with 1.5x crops it’s around 16MP, and with full frame 35mm then its around 24MP. That’s my best guess. Yes, if you are printing big enough to notice the difference it will be important, but most of us aren’t.

I also don’t buy the whole thing of needing lots of pixels even when you do print large. I’ve printed to 6ft x 4ft fine art print from a 10MP Nikon D200 native file, converted to jpeg from the raw, and I have printed A3 dps* brochures from a 3MP Nikon/Kodak camera (back in the 1990s) that was a lot worse than 90% of current mobile phones! But, the quality and ability to render colours and tonality is vitally important, more so than how many you have.

I firmly believe that dynamic range is very important, because if you increase that then you already reduce the noise in the shadows and reduce the chance of burned out highlights. You reduce the compromises, and you reduce the need for external filtration. I want cameras to see the range we see, and we are still a long way from that. The human eye is very adaptable, not so much as some birds and animals but way better than a camera.

So, anyway, I thought I’d switch to Olympus (and if you’ve read my other posts then you know how that turned out…)

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Olympus PEN-F, 9-18mm f4.0-5.6 (in camera jpeg)

I guess in the end part of it was that I really missed the familiarity that comes with years of using Nikon. The menus are familiar, the buttons are (largely) in the same place. I favour Nikon over Canon for two reasons (and here I start another fight) – firstly, in over 25 years, I have only ever had three cameras pack up mid-shoot and they were all Canon’s and all with terminally jammed shutters. Secondly, they move the controls and buttons about and I can’t be doing with relearning a new camera as you’ll also know from my things-i-dont-like-about-the-olympus-pen-f post

Ten minutes with any Nikon and I can use it, in the dark, or at least without looking. I take more photos because I’m not messing about in menus, trying to find things. It feels good in my hand. It feels like an extension of me, and that allows me to get on with the creative art of image making.

I keep more images, because I take more images, and because I am not messing about in menus and not getting the results I think I’m going to get. Or missing the shot because I haven’t found the settings I want.

So, I am going back to big and heavy.

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Nikon D600, Nikon 14-24mm f2.8 nano coated bulbous wotsit

Back to a weighty DSLR. Back to big heavy lenses (not that I went very far away with that bit).

I went to my local used dealer and played around with a Nikon D600. Yes, they have a reputation for dust but to be honest if you pick one up now then they’ve either not had an issue, been back to Nikon for free to have it sorted, or the original owner would have got it replaced by a D610 by Nikon F.O.C. So it’s probably now a bit undeserved, unless you get one from a really lazy owner. It does however make them daft cheap, for what you’re getting.

I played with it for ten minutes and it felt like coming home. It sounds silly but I didn’t need to look at the controls more than once or twice, and, within minutes I had the settings the way I wanted them and saved to custom memory. It was just comfortable…

…welcome home.

And, I now I also have full frame! And with my ideal of 24MP.

I also now have balance! I can use the camera with one hand again, even with the bulbous wotsit (Nikon AF-S 14-24/2.8). The lenses, even the big ones, balance on the camera. I’ve gone a generation back to get the body, and spent the real money on the glass (always the best plan because you’ll change your bodies every few years but good glass lasts, well almost, forever).

My osteopath won’t like it….

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But I do.

And hey, my DSLR with a little 50mm/f1.8 prime even weighs less than my XT-2 with the zoom.

*double page spread, ie. an A3 centrefold in an A4 product

End of Summer

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End of Summer

The wind was blowing off the sea, waves crashed on the shore, the beach was empty aside from a couple walking their dog.

Fleeting Summer has…

…gone.

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You can buy a little piece of paradise

Tunes rattled around my head as the wind blew my hair into interesting configurations.

Phil Collins
Don Henley

and

Led Zeppelin

 

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Stairway to Heaven?

An alternative to ‘real’ food? (Updated)

According to Huel there are now over 7billion people on the planet and, from a food point of view, that number and the expected growth to 9.7billion by 2050 isn’t sustainable. We, the westernised humans, also throw away a lot of food while at the same time eating badly.

They offer us a simple, singular, solution: Huel, a complete food in powdered form that requires some water and a vigorous shake. What you end up with a sort of milk shake, although there is no milk in it. There are in fact no animal products at all, making this option completely vegan.

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The starter pack with added flavour sachets
But, is it realistic not to eat food? Are we denying ourselves a fundamental pleasure or is it just social programming from an early part of our lives?

I am going to find out.

Today, I embarked on a Huel conversion programme as my starter pack arrived. Firstly, let me tell you what is in the pack: You get two big bags of the complete food powder which equals (at the recommended measure) 28 meals. You also get two scoops (and I ordered a spare, which was free) so I have three of them as I always loose these things, a booklet on how to get started, a drink mixer/bottle, and a promotional free t-shirt so you can identify other weirdos around where you live.

This little lot costs you £45 including delivery, unless you have an IV or AB postcode in which case you’ll be penalised for an extra £3 delivery charge, and your delivery will take twice as long…

I should also point out at this stage that as far as I am aware I have no food allergies. I also don’t have a colon, which means that a vegetarian or vegan diet in the traditional sense is very difficult for me. To be frank, it comes out like it goes in, and my body struggles to benefit from food, especially vegetables, beans, pulses, and all the things that are part of that diet and/or good for you. I am supposed to take a vitamin and mineral supplement but most of the time I forget.

This is another reason I wanted to try Huel. I actually have a lot of trouble eating, well no that’s not true, I have no problem eating, but I have a lot of trouble digesting food. I am hoping that my body will like Huel, that I will feel better, perhaps loose a little weight from the bad stuff I can eat so very easily (and also digest), and maybe my consciousness will be better because I won’t be contributing to the suffering of animals.

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My first Huel experience
I had a nice email conservation with the founder of Huel about my specific diet issues, and the lack of a colon, and he recommended that I start with replacing one meal a day and use a blender rather than just shaking the mixture in the bottle. So this is what I am doing. I also started with the sweetened Vanilla flavour as recommended on their website.

I made up the recommended amount following the simple instructions, and took a sip. Not too bad, I thought. It doesn’t taste, as some allege, like cold Ready Brek. I actually like Ready Brek. I had a few more sips, and was fine until the sweetness become rather overpowering and I started to gag a little. In preparation for this I had bought some cocoa powder, unsweetened straight cocoa rather than drinking chocolate, and thought I would add a teaspoon of that to it. Whilst this did improve the flavour quite considerably, I was still getting this slightly queasy feeling that I really didn’t like at all. By the time I got around 4/5th of the way through my bottle I felt quite nauseous and so stopped at that point and the rest went down the sink.

Now, I am expecting some ‘bloating and wind issues’, as they are quite well documented on their forum’s and especially during the transition phase. Perhaps the bloating was starting very quickly, even during consumption, and that was the source of the nausea? Or, maybe I just should have ordered the unsweetened version. I feel that I may make my “meals” a bit more watery, and therefore hopefully less sweet, by using a bit less powder to water. The recommended ratio is 5:1 but I might go for a good bit less. This was actually recommended, to me, by the founder, but I wanted to try the authentic initial experience like everyone else first.

As well as ordering the standard starter pack, I also ordered a sample pack of all the supplementary flavours that Huel provide. Some sound more tempting that others; chocolate and coffee sound good, not sure about the custard one. I might also try adding some fresh fruit which should give it more of a kick, and make it more like a smoothie. Hopefully taking away some of that ickyness. There is a definite ickyness to this stuff as it comes.

Half an hour after consuming I feel like I have had a small meal, but I still fancy a biscuit. I’ll be good, and I will experiment more with the next meal option. Perhaps a flavour or fruit? Perhaps if I get around to consuming this lot and ordering more I might try the unflavoured and unsweetened version as I thin this make actually suit my palette better.

I feel a little dizzy and odd, if I am honest, but I can’t say for sure that’s the Huel although I do feel a little disorientated which is most weird. Others have also reported this, but usually after three days when their body is protesting at the removal of some of our naughtier addictions, such as sugar and caffeine, but maybe there is more to it that that?

Watch this space…

 Day 2

I have to confess that I didn’t have any Huel today. To be honest I couldn’t face it. I was put off not only by the sickly flavouring but by the strange after effects, but mainly the over sweet flavour. I would certainly order the non-sweetened and non-flavoured one in the future.

Day 3

Made myself some Huel today, but made it thinner (2 scoops instead of the recommended 3) in an attempt to make it a bit more palatable. I also added some of Huel’s Mocha flavouring which really improved the flavour. The thing is, I had three good mouthfalls and I started to get a headache in one spot. Then the nausea hit me! OMG. Then, worse was yet to come, my mouth started to feel weird and I couldn’t stop salivating. I had to sit down. I can only assume I was having a proper allergic reaction to one or more of the ingredients. My blood pressure dropped and I was unable to get out the chair without hanging on to something. I had to go to the bathroom on my hands and knees, as it was upstairs there was no way I was going to do that vertical. I couldn’t believe it at first. But I was fine yesterday, and absolutely fine moments before. 

Once I started to feel better, a pint of water and an hour later, I did some research. The only ingredient I have not exposed myself to before, at least as far as I am aware of and which constitutes a significant part of Huel is flaxseed. Although rare, it is possible to have the reaction to flaxseed that I have described above. I cannot see that is it anything else, although I would need proper allergy testing to be certain of course. 

I read on the Livestrong website that people who have digestive disorders, such as Ulcerative Colitis which was the route of my surgery, should avoid or at least be very careful with Flaxseed but that is mainly due to its laxative effects. 

It can however, evidently, cause reactions in anyone with an autoimmune related disorder. UC, and Crohns, are thought to be caused by the body attacking itself – an autoimmune response. This would make sense to me then that Flaxseed again could be the cause of the issues I am experiencing. Now, obviously, you can’t trust half of what you read on the internet and you need to check things out with multiple sources and get information from recognised respected and peer reviewed websites, but Livestrong has a better reputation that it’s founder (sadly), and there were others which collaborated this evidence including several state sponsored medical ones. 

I had had some real hopes for the Huel diet, but sadly, it has proven not to be for me. And, I now know I have to avoid flaxseeds! Or at least until I can get proper allergy tested.

A better read

After careful consideration, and noticing that this site with wordpress doesn’t really cut it from a photographic point of view, I have separated my photography arm from my writing arm. Which is ok, because I am ambidextrous.

This site, blythestorm.com, will now be dedicated to my writing and my new site blythestormphotography.com will showcase my photography.

The great thing about this is, dear reader, that not only will you be able to read about my photography (and my exploits relating to that) here, but you will also be able to read what I have written on a greater number of subjects. Hopefully these articles will continue to entertain, and hopefully inform, not only my loyal readers but also a wider audience whilst bringing together all my readers into one place. No fighting please.

Those of you who follow me here will already know that I have written about my depression and how creativity, through photography, made a large impact on how I live with it, but did you know that I also write on environmental subjects? If you follow me on Twitter then you’ll know my stance on hunting, especially the illegal persecution of wildlife related to it. Freeing this site from being centred on my photography will mean I will be able to write all my articles to one place and so I have closed my other two blogs, my wildlife/environmental one, and my Olympus PEN-f specific one. But you won’t have to read subjects that don’t interest you, I mean who would? 

I’ve changed the menu so you can see the most recent posts from the front page but easily navigate by subject using the menu to sections which interest you. My photography lessons, which were appearing on my Olympus site will now appear here instead.

All posts will take comments, links, and ping backs etc, although all comments are moderated and subject to site admins approval. There will continue to be no tolerance to abusive or offensive comments so don’t come here to start a fight because I don’t feed trolls. They make nice pets, and I have several on Twitter already, but I really don’t have time to engage with idiots. So, you have been warned. As I said earlier, no fighting please.

I am not migrating any articles from my other sites, the material on this site will be totally new (that’s a relief for the readers and more work for me). If you enjoy an article you can not only comment but you can also support the author by ‘buying me a beer’ by clicking the link at the bottom of the article. This will take you to a PayPal option and you can buy me as many beers as you like by putting in your own price. Any advertising on this site makes money for WordPress, not for me, and I am not paying them to remove it.

Well that’s the update folks, although many of you won’t read it for a few days because you’ll all be turning your iOS up to 11 and since it was only launched tonight it’s bound to mess up. Me? I’m waiting until the rest of the world has suffered for a few days and they release 11.1 with the bugs ironed out. 

Cheerio for now. 

X

End of the affair – how I fell out of love with the Isle of Skye

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Sunset on the first evening, following a day of rain and storms.

After 20 years, my love affair with Skye has, I think, now ended. It is not the island, and it is not the people, it is the crowds.

I arrived in pouring rain, which isn’t unusual for anything on the western most side of Scotland, and the next day, with it forecast to be in for the whole day, took a trip into Portree for supplies.

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A short circular walk from Portree take you to views of Dun Caan, past the memorials for the Nicolson/McNeacail clan, but sadly it is cut short at this point due to a landslip.

Skye has become a victim of its own success, attracting over 60,000 visitors for the August bank holiday weekend alone (according to a resident).  The roads, mainly single track with passing places, just cannot cope. Even if the visitors knew how to drive on them…and too many don’t. Without the docking cruise ships, even with just the coaches, the line for the only ladies toilets stretched for over 60 people and part way around the town. When finally you could get a seat, as it were, the result was barely tolerable, and a long way from pleasant. But at least Portree has toilets…

The third day, my second full day on the island, and looking slightly at slightly more promising weather, I set off the most northerly point on Skye – Rubha Hunish on the Trotternish peninsula. After getting my boots nearly sucked off my feet in the boggy terrain following the lines of walkers to ever nook and cranny, I had wished for my wellies! I also wished it hadn’t rained for days beforehand, and quite a few less people.

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The Lookout; ex-Coastguard station and now Mountain Bothy Association open shelter.
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Looking out The Lookout towards the Outer Hebrides in the rain.
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Now that Trotternish is blessed with 4G (albeit intermittent and only recent acquisition), I wonder if the landline phone still works?
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Rubha Hunish points towards the Uists, with views also of the bottom of the Isle of Harris, and on a clear day, potentially, the Isle of Lewis.
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The fireplace that isn’t, and the interesting book collection (a bible, a German philosopher, and a guidebook to Fungi to mention just three).

The walk is an out and back, which means retracing your steps and trying to keep your boots about you when all about you are losing theirs…

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The Northern end of the Trotternish ridge.

…takes you past a cleared village, and on to meet a sheep sank at the “main” road.

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Sheep station, or sank, by the start/end of the walk.
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The main road from the carpark, and the reminder of a time now gone when red phone boxes were needed, and a passing place would illicit a courteous wave.

Just along the road a bit further is the Skye Museum of Island Life – a collection of Blackhouses showing the islands way of life through the ages.

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Blackhouse
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The reconstruction within this Blackhouse shows how up to ten people, including children, would share a space with box beds. It was quiet, warm, and felt comforting and safe, as the wind was howling again from the north, blowing rain into the face when outside.
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A 150 year old loom which was still being used up until the mid 1950s – Skye residents are still multifaceted with many doing more than one job to provide and income. This is true of most island residents throughout the Scottish isles.
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Replica shop in another Blackhouse.

I was particularly moved by a series of letters from Johnnie dating back to WWI and on display in the final Blackhouse. There was one about him shipping out with his chums to France, and another thanking his sister for her parcel, which had reached him at the front. He said she could put in some tinned Salmon, or Sardines, next time if she felt inclined.

Sadly, Johnnie would never receive the second parcel as the third piece of paper on show is the notification from Kitchener’s war office. Johnnie had been Killed in Action just three days after writing his letter to his sister.

………………………

The next day, the weather forecast was terrible so I decided to explore nearby Camas Mor. Just a few minutes drive from the accommodation it was a lovely bay, small harbour, and was well served by a parking area with bins, two bench seat and tables, and a magnificent view. I would have been perfect it here had been a toilet, but as the residents of Skye will tell you, the Council is not inclined to providing (m)any facilities.

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Camas Mor
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Looking towards the Hebrides again, this time from near Camas Mor.

It proved to actually be the best weather day of the entire trip! Sadly, by the time I realised it wasn’t going to get better it was too late.

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The Lily at Camas Mor.

The day was not wasted, although the birds were nowhere to be seen, and the hoped for wildlife of seals, dolphins, and even whales, never appeared either: Just three Cormorants and a few assorted gulls to show for the hours of patient watching, plus some photos too, of course.

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Hand of God?

Driving back a slightly different route, following the grid pattern of small roads, took me past a derelict church which still had some sections of plaster and painted murals covering the remains of the walls.

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Lovaig Bay and the “Coral” Beaches – made from small shells and calcified seaweed.

The final day of the trip and I was desperate for a walk which wouldn’t be a quagmire, after the days of continual rain. I headed, along with a hundred or more other people (and I don’t exaggerate here) towards Dunvegan. Passing by the castle I hoped the beaches would be quieter and on arriving there was a space or two in the car park. By the time I had walked the 4 miles to the far end of the bay and back I was nearly boxed in by some bad parking to the front, a tree to the rear, and unable to open the passenger door for the inconsiderate parking of the neighbour. Almost every car in the place had a ’17’ plate and a sticker on the fuel filler cap reminding the driver what to fill it up with. According to the residents I spoke to, almost every car you see between 7am and 7pm is a hire car. Or a camper van…

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Waves at Lovaig Bay.

My dog ran into the waves, got soaked right over, and came out grinning (Staffordshire Bull Terriers not only have the ability to ‘smile’ but also seem to have very good comic timing and a well judged sense of humour. My first one used to go and sit on the lino’ in the hall when he wanted to fart because it made it much louder…no kidding).

When I got my current squeeze, he was terrified of everything and that including the sea. Now, four years later, he can’t wait to get his paws wet. Watching his shear joy and exuberance of running into the waves made the whole trip, and even the bad weather worth it, but I am sure there were less people in Edinburgh during the Fringe than there was on the Isle of Skye last week.

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The End

Shooting my depression

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In 2004, and again in 2005, I had two major surgeries. I don’t know if I suffered depression as a result of the anaesthetic, the ill health that preceded it, or if it was just my time and my turn. I mean, one in three of us is going to get at some point. But, I got through it, without any therapy type help and with only a short spell on medication. Then it happened again.

Around five years ago I suffered another, more severe, spell of depression. This time I was suicidal, although I wouldn’t admit it to anyone. I think the doctor figured it out, and she talked to me about lots of things other than why I felt the way I did. She realised that my one channel of escape was my photography. At the time, creativity was the last thing I felt capable of. But, she also realised I had a hard streak, a defiant tenacity that surfaced, sometimes in anger, and sadly often in alcohol.

She saw I needed a direction, and she challenged me. She suggested that even a “professional photographer” couldn’t come up with a decent image every day.  I argued, that they could. I believed I could. The challenge was set.

Of course, she probably didn’t quite understand quite how tenacious I can be, or how determined (read also as ‘bloody minded’). I didn’t just decide to come up with one decent image a day, but to come up with one decent image a day EVERYDAY, for A YEAR.

I started on New Years Day, at dawn. And I took three photos;

They weren’t very good and I didn’t even have a decent camera at the time. I’d been depressed now for several months and I’d lost pretty much everything; work, money, I’d hocked my equipment, I sold my self esteem.

At the time I decided to do this, I didn’t actually realise how difficult this would be. It wasn’t difficult to come up with an image, but to come up with a new image, every day, when all I wanted to do was stay in bed and cry was bloody hard work. But, it did something for my depression; it made me get out of bed and get off my arse. It made me get outside in the fresh air, sometimes in the pouring rain, and do something.

My depression lifted, eventually, around four months after I first contemplated my suicide and realised I needed help. Medication was a part of it, a very necessary part of it, and regular conversations with my GP helped no end. Support from my friends, some who really understood because they’d been in their own hells, helped too. But the thing that I think made such a huge difference, to me, was getting out there with my camera and taking photos. I treated every day as an assignment, as if someone were going to be paying me to get the shot. It was hard, and I didn’t always feel like it, and sometimes I would rage against myself, my friends, and inwardly at the whole world. But I got out there and I took my photos. I did it with a cold, I even managed a photo with flu taken in the kitchen whilst trying desperately not to cough and then I threw up.

I couldn’t work at the time, nobody would have employed me the state I was in, but it helped me to think that one day they might. It helped me to think that what I was doing would be seen by other people so I made an online blog, and I published my photos of the day, each day, and every day. I didn’t have the money to go very far, so many of my images were based on the area in which I was living at the time and I think that’s partly why I ended up with a small but quite dedicated local following.

The photos that I took during this period weren’t very good, and looking back now I can actually see my periods of lowest mood from the images I shot. Some are very dark, and very sad. Some are angry and raging against the injustices I felt in the world, my little world or the bigger one. Some are just boring photos that I took to get the job over with. Some make me chuckle.

And just some of those images are still in my portfolio today.

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Looking back on them now whilst I can see my depression, or the effect it was having on me at times, I am also reminded that actually I am a damned fine photographer.

My depression is always with me, always lurking around somewhere waiting. I do not hide from it, and I do not pretend it isn’t there. Some days, even just this week, I want to stop the world and get off, to hide in the closet and never come out again. Some days I get up feeling inspired, then it sort of just…goes down hill from there. Whatever I am feeling though, I know I can channel some it into my photography. The results may not be publishable, and I might even delete the whole damn lot, but I know that going out and creating something works more times than it does not. Some times going out isn’t possible, but that doesn’t matter either.

I would say, because of the audience this site has, that I have never let a client down, and I never will. Not if it’s in my control, even when my depression isn’t. I have never not turned up on a job and I have no intention of starting now, no matter how hard it is sometimes to get out of my pit and actually do it, but I do it, always.

When I am shooting for myself, or just shooting as a prelude or prospect, then some days the creative juices flow, and some days they don’t. Some days I can write from 4am until 4am the next day and other days the words won’t come out at all. But it doesn’t really matter, they’re only words and photographs anyway. They aren’t going to determine the future of anyones life but mine. And some days that doesn’t seem to mean much either.

Thank you for listening.

Blythe